Online Seminar Announcement: Thursday 4 June 2020

Due to the cancellation of many scientific conferences, the AUCAOS committee is pleased to announce an online seminar series. We intend to run seminars on the first Thursday of every month until normal conferences can resume.

Date: Thursday 4 June

Time:
1pm (QLD, NSW, ACT, Vic, Tas)
12:30pm (SA, NT)
11am (WA)
3pm (New Zealand)

Click this link to join the meeting: https://jcu.zoom.us/j/99887544733?pwd=TVk1ZFl3WGtSWHJmMTM3dG9BVk1jQT09

Seminar schedule
Each talk is 20 minutes duration followed by approximately 5 minutes for questions and discussion.

Time (QLD time, adjust as needed): Presentation:
1:00 – 1:25pm An introduction into synthetic molecular motors
Jos Kistemaker
The University of Queensland

Scientific advances made in the last three decades, inspired by Nature’s example, has led to a diverse collection of synthetic molecular machinery. A prominent example of this machinery is the molecular motor developed by Feringa and co-workers which is based on a light driven overcrowded alkene. The study of several generations of molecular motors and their properties have had primarily academic merit, however, later developments have shown that these nanomachines can be used to do actual work and might prove to be the driving force in the transition to actual applications.
This talk will provide an introduction into the field of synthetic molecular motors with an emphasis on light driven rotary motors. The role of autonomy and chirality in different designs will be highlighted and several examples will be used to showcase the expression and translation of these features to other groups, molecules and larger scales.

1:25 – 1:50pm Electronic coupling: A significant contributor to electron transfer between similarly structured surface-bound porphyrins and Co2+/3+ complex electrolytes
Mr Inseong Cho
University of Wollongong

Electronic coupling is often assumed to play a minor role in interfacial electron transfer (ET) between similarly structured electron donors and acceptors. To check this assumption, we investigated the ET kinetics between four surface-bound free-base and Zn porphyrins and five Co2+/3+ complexes redox mediators with different ligands using transient absorption spectroscopy (TAS). The ET rates measured in this work are the fastest reported in the literature for surface-bound molecules and donors dissolved in electrolytes. By using a novel sub-ns TA setup, the importance of enhanced TAS time-resolution is demonstrated. Fitting the measured ET rate versus –ΔG resulted in poor fits with unrealistic trends in reorganisation energy values. This is explained by up to 60% variation of the electronic coupling (HDA) depending on the size of the alkyl-substituent of the Co2+/3+ complexes redox mediator. The HDA values obtained by assuming a constant reorganisation energy are shown to be dependent on tunnelling distances, characterised by tunnelling attenuation factor βel = 0.16 to 2.0 Å-1. This work suggests that changes in electronic coupling even by small structural modification previously considered negligible can be as significant as the effect of driving force.

1:50 – 2:00pm Open discussion

 

During the seminar:

  • Please keep your microphone muted unless you are speaking. This is to reduce the background noise and avoid disrupting the presenter.
  • You will be automatically muted when you join the virtual meeting room. To speak, you will need to unmute yourself by using the audio controls in the lower left of the Zoom window.
  • If you have not used Zoom before, then it is recommended that you join 5 minutes before the starting time to ensure that you have your software set up correctly.

Please be aware that the talks will be recorded and posted on the AUCAOS website.

Previous seminars

Previous seminars can be viewed here: https://seminars.aucaos.org.au/

Call for abstracts

Seminars are held on the first Thursday of each month.

In the spirit of building a community in these challenging times, you are encouraged to give a talk. Do you have a talk that you would have given at a conference that was cancelled? Please consider adapting that talk for this format.

Submit abstract by email to bronson[dot]philippa[at]jcu[dot]edu[dot]au.


Online Seminar Announcement: Thursday 7 May 2020

Due to the cancellation of many scientific conferences, the AUCAOS committee is pleased to announce an online seminar series. We intend to run seminars on the first Thursday of every month until normal conferences can resume.

Date: Thursday 7 May

Time:
1pm (QLD, NSW, ACT, Vic, Tas)
12:30pm (SA, NT)
11am (WA)

Click this link to join the meeting: https://jcu.zoom.us/j/95510880226?pwd=OEhnS2c1d3BGdkdTV1Mwd2F4V21QUT09

Seminar schedule
Each talk is 20 minutes duration followed by approximately 5 minutes for questions and discussion.

Time (East coast, adjust as needed): Presentation:
1:00 – 1:25pm Microstructure formation in solution-processed semiconducting polymer thin films
Prof. Chris McNeill
Monash University

Semiconducting polymers are interesting materials that are being developed for a wide range of applications including polymer field-effect transistors, polymer solar cells, and polymer light emitting diodes. The performance of such devices is strongly dependent upon the thin film microstructure of the active semiconducting polymer thin film. As semiconducting polymers are processed from solution, the resulting thin film microstructure is complicated and can be hard to control. In this presentation I will present research performed in my group aimed at understanding how microstructure forms in solution-processed semiconducting polymer thin films. A focus will be placed on the n-type naphthalene dimide-based polymer P(NDI2OD-T2) which exhibits a rich microstructure and good performance in field-effect transistors and polymer solar cells. The influence of molecular weight and processing conditions on thin film microstructure will be discussed, along with the impact of thin film microstructure on field-effect transistor performance. This talk will also feature a host of different synchrotron-based techniques that have been used to understand the polymer physics and microstructure of this system.

1:25 – 1:50pm Charge transport in disordered materials for photodetector applications
Dr. Almantas Pivrikas
Murdoch University

Non-crystalline disordered semiconductors such as organic molecules, polymers, nanoparticles offer great advantage for electronic devices where the novel physics as well is yet to uncovered. All these materials lack long range structural order and have one common feature – their electrical conduction is inferior compared to highly-crystalline inorganic semiconductors such as silicon because of orders of magnitude lower electron and hole mobilities as well as strong recombination rates. Yet, organic electronic devices made using these disordered materials have the performance comparable to their classical inorganic counterparts.
Photoconductivity and charge transport measurement techniques such as Time-of-Flight or Hall-effect are typically not applicable or unreliable to study the charge transport in these disordered systems. In this presentation the core problems with experimental issues will be explained and our novel techniques introduced. Our work relating to hot photocarrier utilization in photodetectors as well as the novel peculiarities of charge carrier recombination in crystalline and disordered semiconductors will be demonstrated.

 

During the seminar:

  • Please keep your microphone muted unless you are speaking. This is to reduce the background noise and avoid disrupting the presenter.
  • You will be automatically muted when you join the virtual meeting room. To speak, you will need to unmute yourself by using the audio controls in the lower left of the Zoom window.
  • If you have not used Zoom before, then it is recommended that you join 5 minutes before the starting time to ensure that you have your software set up correctly.

Please be aware that the talks will be recorded and posted on the AUCAOS website.

Call for abstracts

The next online seminar will be held on Thursday 4 June 2020.

In the spirit of building a community in these challenging times, you are encouraged to give a talk. Do you have a talk that you would have given at a conference that was cancelled? Please consider adapting that talk for this format.

Submit abstract by email to bronson[dot]philippa[at]jcu[dot]edu[dot]au.


Online seminar series

Due to the cancellation of many scientific conferences, the AUCAOS committee is pleased to announce an online seminar series. We intend to run monthly seminars until normal conferences can resume.

We are calling for speakers for the first seminar session. It is hoped that our speakers can adapt talks that they would have otherwise given at conferences that have been cancelled.

Date: Thursday 7 May
Time:
• 1pm (QLD, NSW, ACT, Vic, Tas)
• 12:30pm (SA, NT)
• 11am (WA)
Format: Zoom meeting link to be distributed. Each session will consist of 1 – 2 talks of approximately 20 minutes each, followed by discussion.

To be considered for a speaking slot, please write a title and short abstract for your talk and email to bronson[dot]philippa[at]jcu[dot]edu[dot]au. We are calling upon the community to pull together to ensure that we can continue scientific communication in these times. Please consider giving a talk.


Ivan Kassal Awarded Le Fèvre Medal

AUCAOS member Ivan Kassal has been awarded the 2020 Le Fèvre Medal from the Australian Academy of Science, recognising “outstanding basic research in chemistry by researchers up to 10 years post-PhD”.

For more information, including a video, please follow the links below:

https://www.science.org.au/opportunities-scientists/recognition/honorific-awards/early-career-awards/le-f%C3%A8vre-memorial-prize

https://www.science.org.au/opportunities-scientists/recognition/honorific-awards/honorific-awardees/2020-awardees#fevre


AUCAOS Symposium 2019

85 delegates from around Australia and NZ attended the third AUCAOS Symposium at Katoomba, New South Wales.

The talks included an exciting range of topics in the field of organic semiconductors, including a keynote presentation by Priv.-Doz. Dr. Alexander Colsmann of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, whose talk was entitled, “Eco‐friendly solution processing of organic solar cells”.

We would like to thank our sponsors – Australian Centre for Advanced Photovoltaics (ACAP), ARC Centre of Excellence in Exciton Science, SCITEK Australia Pty Ltd, John Morris Group, AINSE, Lastek Pty Ltd and the Australian National Fabrication Facility, Queensland Node – once again for their kind contribution.